Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre

Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre, a North London dental office. 

Dr. Brad Carson, Dr. Dave Aiello and Associates are pleased to care for all your general and family dental needs.
Some of the many dental services we provide are:

              -  cosmetic dentistry, orthodontic dentistry and Invisalign
              -  tooth whitening, veneers, dental implants, crowns and bridges
              -  root canals, treatment for periodontal disease, and treatment for sensitive teeth

 

We are conveniently located at 607 Fanshawe Park Rd. W in London, Ontario (at the corner of Fanshawe and Wonderland). 

We have ample free parking and offer extended hours to accommodate our patients needs.  We are wheelchair accessible.

 

We are committed to providing our patients with a complete range of dental services in a friendly, caring and comfortable environment. 
 

New patients are always welcome.  Please feel free to call or email us anytime!

Posts Under Prevention

   DOUBLE  TROUBLE FOR YOUR TEETH


For years most of us have heard about the how much sugar is in soft drinks and how bad they are for our teeth. Does that mean if we just drink “diet” sodas, that it is healthy choice for our teeth? Definitely not!  What these drinks lack in sugar, they make up for with acid. The acid in many of the drinks we consume today eat away the enamel on our teeth.  When you put the two together – the sugar and the acid – it spells double trouble for your teeth!

In terms of your teeth, a pH of 5.5 and above will cause little or no harm. Any pH below 5.5 is bad. At 5.5 and below, a liquid will work to strip the protective enamel from your teeth.
 
When you take a sip of soda, juice, and many other drinks, the acid attacks your teeth. Each acid attack lasts around twenty minutes. This happens again with every sip. These continuous acid attacks weaken the tooth enamel. Once the enamel is weakened the bacteria in your mouth can cause a cavity.


It is not just the soft drinks that are so unhealthy for your teeth.  As you will see in the chart below, it is also fruit juices and sports drinks.  All these drinks have become a popular choice for a growing number of people, especially kids, teens and young adults. Too often these drinks are replacing healthy choices such as milk and water in our daily diet.
 
Larger serving sizes make the problem worse. From 6.5 ounces in the 1950s, the typical soft drink can has grown to 12 ounces, (and 20 ounces for a bottle).  Presently, teens drink three times more soda than twenty years ago.
 
It may surprise you to see the chart below – examine it carefully – taking into consideration the acid level and amount of sugar in each drink.



Because the pH scale is logarithmic, a one unit change in pH is associated with a 10 fold change in the acidity. For example, lemon juice has a pH of 2.0, while grapefruit juice has a pH of 3.0. Lemon juice would therefore be 10x as acidic as grapefruit juice. Even more enlightening, Coke Classic is roughly 100 times as acidic as Barq’s root beer.
Recommendations to reduce the affects of sugar and acid on your teeth:

  • Pop, juice and sports drinks should be consumed at meals to limit your teeth’s exposure to sugar and acid.  Do not sip on them all day long.
  • Limit these drinks to 1 can per day
  • Drink through a straw to reduce the direct contact to the teeth
  • Rinse your mouth with water after consuming pop.  It is important to do this prior to brushing your teeth as it will help to neutralize the acids before you brush them into your teeth.
  • Chew xylitol gum or mints after each time you consume these drinks during the day to help to restore the pH to a less acidic level.
  • Never give a young child soda at bedtime. The liquid can pool in the mouth coating the teeth with sugar and acid all night.
  • Always use fluoride toothpaste to protect your enamel.
(Chart information from Missouri Dental Association’s Stop The Pop Site)
 


Bruxism is a condition in which you grind, clench or gnash your teeth. Bruxism and clenching are the most common oral habits, and may occur to some degree in over 80% of the population. Most people subconsciously grind their teeth at night or when they are deep in thought. The normal forces of chewing usually range from 5 to 44 pounds per square inch (psi) for natural teeth. For example, a force of 21 psi is needed to chew meat, and 28 psi to chew a raw carrot. The forces of bruxism can produce loads on the teeth that exceed 500 psi.


There are many causes of bruxism such as stress, tooth alignment/bite, and medication.


While the damage from bruxism is not immediate, over the months and years, the damage from clenching and grinding can be significant. Think of what would happen if you took the oil out of your car and drove it around the block once a night. The damage would not be immediate, but over time it would begin to effect how the car functions.


Bruxism can:

  • flatten teeth, fracture teeth, fracture fillings,
  • cause chipping of the enamel on teeth near the gum line
  • cause tooth sensitivity,
  • cause headaches, earaches, pain in the jaw, neck and shoulders,
  • cause bone loss around the teeth resulting in loose teeth,
  • cause the jaw to lock.


You can’t just stop grinding by telling yourself to do so, but you can protect your teeth and jaw joint from the harmful effects of grinding and clenching by wearing a custom fit night guard. A night guard is made of material that is softer than teeth, so when grinding, the night guard is worn down, and the teeth are protected.
 

A night guard can be made from different materials and is made to fit on the upper or lower teeth. Your dentist will decide what type of material and what type of night guard is best for you. Store bought generic night guards are not recommended as they are not custom fit to your bite and could actually cause more damage to your jaw joint.


To make a custom fit night guard, dental impressions and a bite registration are taken and sent to a lab which then fabricates a night guard to fit perfectly over the teeth. About a week later, a second appointment is required to deliver the appliance. While night guards do take a little bit of time for some people to become accustomed to, most people find they sleep much better with them, than without them.