Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre

NOTE:  As an essential service we will remain open to care for
all your dental needs during the province wide shut-down. 

We continue to take all the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of our patients and team!
 

Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre, a North London dental office. 

 

Dr. Brad Carson, Dr. Dave Aiello and Associates are pleased to care for all your general and family dental needs.

Some of the many dental services we provide are:

              -  cosmetic dentistry, orthodontic dentistry and Invisalign
              -  tooth whitening, veneers, dental implants, crowns and bridges
              -  root canals, treatment for periodontal disease, and treatment for sensitive teeth

 

We are conveniently located at 607 Fanshawe Park Rd. W in London, Ontario (at the corner of Fanshawe and Wonderland). 

We have ample free parking and offer extended hours to accommodate our patients needs.  

We are wheelchair accessible.

 

We are committed to providing our patients with a complete range of dental services in a friendly, caring and comfortable environment. 
 

New patients are always welcome.  Please feel free to call or email us anytime!

 

Posts Under Prevention

Your Child’s First Visit — Make it Fun!

Visiting the dentist for the first time should be a positive, fun experience for your child. There are some things you can do to help prepare your child for their first visit.

                  
Get some books about visiting the dentist and use story time to discuss visiting the dentist. Some children’s books that talk about going to the dentist are:  “Just Going to the Dentist” by Mercer Mayer,  “What to Expect When You Go to the Dentist” By Heidi Murkoff, and “Going to the Dentist” (Usborne First Experiences Book), and “The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist” by Stan & Jan Berenstain.

Practice having your child open wide (like a lion), and count their teeth.  Use a little mirror if you have one.  Let them look at and count your teeth.

Play “Dentist” using props like a toothbrush, a flashlight, and cups for rinsing.  Have your child lie down and open their mouth like they would in a dental chair.  Shine the light in their mouth, count their teeth again.  Even use a toothbrush to “polish” their teeth.  Once you have played dentist with them, and they have practiced on you, have them pretend to take their favourite stuffed animal to the dentist for a check up!  Do this several times over the course of a few weeks prior to their first appointment.
Explain what other things the dentist may do during the appointment.  Use simple, non-technical language. Don’t try to explain X-rays, instead simply say, “The dentist might take some pictures of your teeth with a special camera”.


Prior to booking their first appointment, have them accompany you or an older sibling to a routine dental “check up” appointment.  Let them watch how you do it, and then let them have a ride in the chair, and a treat from the treasure box.  We are happy to accommodate children in this way, as are most offices.  This is a great way to get them familiar with the dental office and the staff.

Let your child bring his or her favourite stuffed toy along to their visit.

What should I NOT do when preparing my child for their first dental visit?

  • Do not wait for an emergency to take your child to the dentist for the first visit.
  • If you are nervous about going to the dentist, do not express any of your own fears or anxieties.
  • Do not use phrases like “It won’t hurt” or “Don’t be scared”. Comments like these are not soothing and usually only create anxiety.
  You should take your child to the dentist when they begin to get their teeth – usually around their first birthday.  Until they are approximately 3 – 4 years old, the visits will be short and are done to ensure that there is no decay or other problems present.  Around the age of 3 – 4, children are usually old enough to sit and have their teeth cleaned, along with a “check-up”.

We love seeing children at Sunningdale Dental, and they love coming to see us.  Give us and they love coming to see us.  Give us a call today to book your child’s first dental visit.
 


If you’re thinking about getting an oral piercing — or if you already have one — there are some health risks you should know about.  A mouth piercing can interfere with speech, chewing, or swallowing, however of more concern are the following:

◦ Infection:  Over 700 different strains of bacteria have been detected in the human mouth.  The site of piercing carries the potential for infection. Food particles can also accumulate around piercings and become a breeding ground for bacteria.

◦ Nerve damage:  Numbness or loss of sensation at the site of the piercing can occur if nerves are damaged when the tongue is pierced. This numbness can be temporary or permanent. Nerve damage can also possibly change your sense of taste or how you move your mouth.

◦ Prolonged bleeding.  The tongue is quite vascular, and if blood vessels are punctured during piercing, prolonged bleeding can occur and can cause serious blood loss.

◦ Swelling.  Swelling commonly occurs after oral piercing. Following piercing, it can be severe enough to block the airway and make breathing difficult.

◦ Excessive drooling and difficulty speaking and eating: Oral jewelry can cause excessive saliva production and can affect your ability to pronounce words clearly.

◦ Damage to teeth:  Teeth that come into contact with mouth jewelry can chip or crack. One study in a dental journal reported that 47% of people wearing barbell tongue jewelry for 4 or more years had at least one chipped tooth

   
 ◦
 Gum disease: People with oral piercings have a greater risk of gum 
 disease than those without oral piercings. The jewelry can come into contact
 with gum tissue causing injury as well as a recession of the gum tissue, which
 can lead to loose teeth and tooth loss.


◦ Allergic reaction to metal. An allergic reaction to the metal in the jewelry can occur in susceptible people.

 Jewelry aspiration. Jewelry that becomes loose in the mouth can become a choking hazard and, if swallowed, can result in injury to the lungs or digestive track.

◦ X-rays: Mouth jewelry can interfere with dental radiographs (x-rays).

◦ Bloodborne disease transmission: Oral piercing is a potential risk factor for the transmission of herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B and C.

◦ Heart Problems: Oral piercings carry a potential risk of endocarditis, an inflammation of the heart valves or tissues. Bacteria can enter the bloodstream through the piercing site in the mouth and travel to the heart, where they can cause serious problems.

Gum infection could be linked to Alzheimer's a new study says.

A study has found that people with poor oral hygiene or gum disease could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's compared with those who have healthy teeth.


Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, discovered (2013) the presence of a bacterium called Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of patients who had dementia when they were alive. The bug is usually associated with chronic periodontal (gum) disease.


According to new research published by Dr. Stephen Dominy and Casey Lynch (2019), their team's "publication sheds light on an unexpected driver of Alzheimer's pathology -- the bacterium commonly associated with chronic gum disease," adding that it also shows a "promising" approach to address the disease.
 

Previous studies have established a link between periodontal disease and Alzheimer's, Lynch said. She said that the new research observes a "highly significant" link between Alzheimer's and the oral infection.
 

For more information, click on the link below:
https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/24/health/alzheimers-disease-gum-infection-treatment-study-intl/index.html

Brushing alone is not enough to achieve optimal oral health.   Since toothbrushes have limited access to the surfaces between the teeth bacteria can accumulate, multiply and remain undisturbed. Undisturbed plaque can cause gingival inflammation and bleeding and increase the risk for and progression of periodontal disease.  Accessing the spaces between the teeth can be challenging!

waterflosserOne option to clean these areas between the teeth is floss.  Another option available is a water flosser.  If you don’t like to floss or find it difficult, a water flosser may be a great option for you.

There are two key elements in how the Water Flosser works; pulsation and pressure.  Pulsation has been shown to be three times more effective than a steady stream.  It works by providing a compression and decompression phase that allows for the clearing of bacteria and debris from the pocket.  Studies have shown that it can remove plaque biofilm from pockets up to 6mm deep.

There are several models available, and several manufacturers.  For best results make sure you purchase one that has both pulsation and pressure options.

cordless pngwaterpik tips rfMany people prefer a “cordless” model which is also available.  There are also various tips you can use – if you are unsure which tip would be best for you, ask your dentist or dental hygienist at your next visit.


When using a water flosser follow the tips below: 

  • Fill the reservoir with warm water, or warm water and an antibacterial mouthwash, and place it wpon the base, pressing down firmly to ensure full seating.
  • Select the tip and press firmly into the handle. 
  • Adjust the pressure control (start at low pressure). 
  • Lean over the sink and place tip in mouth.
  • Turn unit on. Close lips to prevent splashing, while allowing water to flow from mouth into sink. 
  • Start with the back teeth and pause briefly (3 secs) between teeth, aiming the tip just above the gum line at a 90 degree angle. 
  • When finished, turn unit off and use the tip eject button to remove the tip. 
  • Remove water from reservoir.

If you would like more information, ask us during your next dental appointment.

The next time you go to spit on the ground – think twice – you are wasting a         valuable asset!   The average person produces about 1.5 litres of saliva (spit) each day. That is approximately 45 litres per month, so luckily there is still enough saliva to spit some out once in a while. Saliva is produced by 3 glands in your mouth.  These glands are found in your cheeks (between your ear and nose), on the floor of your mouth near your lower molar teeth, and under your tongue.
 
Although your saliva is 99.5% water, it has many important functions.
 
1.  Saliva neutralizes acids that can erode teeth.  Saliva not only helps to dilute acids in the mouth, but it will actually neutralize it due to its alkalinity (alkaline is the opposite of acid – one will cancel out the other). This neutralization of the acid will help to minimize the harmful effect of acid on teeth.  Acids found in our mouths can be from several sources:
 
■   Plaque bacteria on your teeth produce acids.
■   Acids are found in many of the beverages and foods that we consume.
■   Acid can get into our mouth through acid-reflux from the stomach, or from vomiting.
 
2.  Saliva helps maintain tooth integrity.  Demineralization occurs when acids attack the tooth enamel (outer layer of tooth).  When the acids try to dissolve the enamel the buffering capacity of saliva inhibits the demineralization and helps to prevent a cavity from forming.  Saliva also contains minerals that help to keep teeth strong. When an acid attach takes place, saliva will first neutralize the acid. If demineralization has taken place on the tooth, the saliva will then start to remineralize the tooth by strengthening the weakened area with the calcium and phosphate minerals is contains.
 
3.  Saliva plays an important role in preventing tooth decay.  Saliva contains antimicrobial enzymes (such as lysozyme) which kill some bacteria. Saliva has been shown to slow the growth of a cavity-causing strain of bacteria known as streptococcus mutans.
 
4.  Saliva strengthens newly-erupted teeth.  When teeth first erupt, the enamel on them isn’t fully developed.  The calcium, phosphate and fluoride present in saliva help to fill in the weak parts of the new enamel and make the teeth strong.
 
5.  Saliva aids in eating, swallowing and digestion. Unless food is moistened by saliva, it cannot be properly tasted or chewed.  Dry food is very difficult to swallow if not moistened by saliva. It can tear the lining of the throat if it is too dry on the way down.  Liquid is needed to be able to swallow properly.  Saliva rinses away any extra food that may be stuck on your teeth.  Saliva contains the enzyme amylase and lipase, which aid in digestion as well.  Food that is not moistened by saliva is also difficult for the stomach to process or digest.

6.  Saliva aids in speech.   Normal speech is actually impossible without saliva.  Speaking dries out the mouth, so that is why you often see people giving speeches taking sips of water.
 

   DOUBLE  TROUBLE FOR YOUR TEETH


For years most of us have heard about the how much sugar is in soft drinks and how bad they are for our teeth. Does that mean if we just drink “diet” sodas, that it is healthy choice for our teeth? Definitely not!  What these drinks lack in sugar, they make up for with acid. The acid in many of the drinks we consume today eat away the enamel on our teeth.  When you put the two together – the sugar and the acid – it spells double trouble for your teeth!

In terms of your teeth, a pH of 5.5 and above will cause little or no harm. Any pH below 5.5 is bad. At 5.5 and below, a liquid will work to strip the protective enamel from your teeth.
 
When you take a sip of soda, juice, and many other drinks, the acid attacks your teeth. Each acid attack lasts around twenty minutes. This happens again with every sip. These continuous acid attacks weaken the tooth enamel. Once the enamel is weakened the bacteria in your mouth can cause a cavity.


It is not just the soft drinks that are so unhealthy for your teeth.  As you will see in the chart below, it is also fruit juices and sports drinks.  All these drinks have become a popular choice for a growing number of people, especially kids, teens and young adults. Too often these drinks are replacing healthy choices such as milk and water in our daily diet.
 
Larger serving sizes make the problem worse. From 6.5 ounces in the 1950s, the typical soft drink can has grown to 12 ounces, (and 20 ounces for a bottle).  Presently, teens drink three times more soda than twenty years ago.
 
It may surprise you to see the chart below – examine it carefully – taking into consideration the acid level and amount of sugar in each drink.



Because the pH scale is logarithmic, a one unit change in pH is associated with a 10 fold change in the acidity. For example, lemon juice has a pH of 2.0, while grapefruit juice has a pH of 3.0. Lemon juice would therefore be 10x as acidic as grapefruit juice. Even more enlightening, Coke Classic is roughly 100 times as acidic as Barq’s root beer.
Recommendations to reduce the affects of sugar and acid on your teeth:

  • Pop, juice and sports drinks should be consumed at meals to limit your teeth’s exposure to sugar and acid.  Do not sip on them all day long.
  • Limit these drinks to 1 can per day
  • Drink through a straw to reduce the direct contact to the teeth
  • Rinse your mouth with water after consuming pop.  It is important to do this prior to brushing your teeth as it will help to neutralize the acids before you brush them into your teeth.
  • Chew xylitol gum or mints after each time you consume these drinks during the day to help to restore the pH to a less acidic level.
  • Never give a young child soda at bedtime. The liquid can pool in the mouth coating the teeth with sugar and acid all night.
  • Always use fluoride toothpaste to protect your enamel.
(Chart information from Missouri Dental Association’s Stop The Pop Site)
 


Bruxism is a condition in which you grind, clench or gnash your teeth. Bruxism and clenching are the most common oral habits, and may occur to some degree in over 80% of the population. Most people subconsciously grind their teeth at night or when they are deep in thought. The normal forces of chewing usually range from 5 to 44 pounds per square inch (psi) for natural teeth. For example, a force of 21 psi is needed to chew meat, and 28 psi to chew a raw carrot. The forces of bruxism can produce loads on the teeth that exceed 500 psi.


There are many causes of bruxism such as stress, tooth alignment/bite, and medication.


While the damage from bruxism is not immediate, over the months and years, the damage from clenching and grinding can be significant. Think of what would happen if you took the oil out of your car and drove it around the block once a night. The damage would not be immediate, but over time it would begin to effect how the car functions.


Bruxism can:

  • flatten teeth, fracture teeth, fracture fillings,
  • cause chipping of the enamel on teeth near the gum line
  • cause tooth sensitivity,
  • cause headaches, earaches, pain in the jaw, neck and shoulders,
  • cause bone loss around the teeth resulting in loose teeth,
  • cause the jaw to lock.


You can’t just stop grinding by telling yourself to do so, but you can protect your teeth and jaw joint from the harmful effects of grinding and clenching by wearing a custom fit night guard. A night guard is made of material that is softer than teeth, so when grinding, the night guard is worn down, and the teeth are protected.
 

A night guard can be made from different materials and is made to fit on the upper or lower teeth. Your dentist will decide what type of material and what type of night guard is best for you. Store bought generic night guards are not recommended as they are not custom fit to your bite and could actually cause more damage to your jaw joint.


To make a custom fit night guard, dental impressions and a bite registration are taken and sent to a lab which then fabricates a night guard to fit perfectly over the teeth. About a week later, a second appointment is required to deliver the appliance. While night guards do take a little bit of time for some people to become accustomed to, most people find they sleep much better with them, than without them.