Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre

NOTE:  As an essential service we will remain open to care for
all your dental needs during the province wide shut-down. 

We continue to take all the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of our patients and team!
 

Welcome to Sunningdale Dental Centre, a North London dental office. 

 

Dr. Brad Carson, Dr. Dave Aiello and Associates are pleased to care for all your general and family dental needs.

Some of the many dental services we provide are:

              -  cosmetic dentistry, orthodontic dentistry and Invisalign
              -  tooth whitening, veneers, dental implants, crowns and bridges
              -  root canals, treatment for periodontal disease, and treatment for sensitive teeth

 

We are conveniently located at 607 Fanshawe Park Rd. W in London, Ontario (at the corner of Fanshawe and Wonderland). 

We have ample free parking and offer extended hours to accommodate our patients needs.  

We are wheelchair accessible.

 

We are committed to providing our patients with a complete range of dental services in a friendly, caring and comfortable environment. 
 

New patients are always welcome.  Please feel free to call or email us anytime!

 

Posts Under Misc

Your Child’s First Visit — Make it Fun!

Visiting the dentist for the first time should be a positive, fun experience for your child. There are some things you can do to help prepare your child for their first visit.

                  
Get some books about visiting the dentist and use story time to discuss visiting the dentist. Some children’s books that talk about going to the dentist are:  “Just Going to the Dentist” by Mercer Mayer,  “What to Expect When You Go to the Dentist” By Heidi Murkoff, and “Going to the Dentist” (Usborne First Experiences Book), and “The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist” by Stan & Jan Berenstain.

Practice having your child open wide (like a lion), and count their teeth.  Use a little mirror if you have one.  Let them look at and count your teeth.

Play “Dentist” using props like a toothbrush, a flashlight, and cups for rinsing.  Have your child lie down and open their mouth like they would in a dental chair.  Shine the light in their mouth, count their teeth again.  Even use a toothbrush to “polish” their teeth.  Once you have played dentist with them, and they have practiced on you, have them pretend to take their favourite stuffed animal to the dentist for a check up!  Do this several times over the course of a few weeks prior to their first appointment.
Explain what other things the dentist may do during the appointment.  Use simple, non-technical language. Don’t try to explain X-rays, instead simply say, “The dentist might take some pictures of your teeth with a special camera”.


Prior to booking their first appointment, have them accompany you or an older sibling to a routine dental “check up” appointment.  Let them watch how you do it, and then let them have a ride in the chair, and a treat from the treasure box.  We are happy to accommodate children in this way, as are most offices.  This is a great way to get them familiar with the dental office and the staff.

Let your child bring his or her favourite stuffed toy along to their visit.

What should I NOT do when preparing my child for their first dental visit?

  • Do not wait for an emergency to take your child to the dentist for the first visit.
  • If you are nervous about going to the dentist, do not express any of your own fears or anxieties.
  • Do not use phrases like “It won’t hurt” or “Don’t be scared”. Comments like these are not soothing and usually only create anxiety.
  You should take your child to the dentist when they begin to get their teeth – usually around their first birthday.  Until they are approximately 3 – 4 years old, the visits will be short and are done to ensure that there is no decay or other problems present.  Around the age of 3 – 4, children are usually old enough to sit and have their teeth cleaned, along with a “check-up”.

We love seeing children at Sunningdale Dental, and they love coming to see us.  Give us and they love coming to see us.  Give us a call today to book your child’s first dental visit.
 


There are many suggestions out there on home remedies for tooth whitening. They range from mixing a half a teaspoon of baking soda together with a teaspoon of lemon juice and brushing with it, to adding salt to your toothpaste, to rubbing a banana peel on your teeth, to apple cider vinegar, to hydrogen peroxide. The efficacy of these methods is very doubtful, and the risk of permanent damage to your teeth far outweighs the benefit.

In this blog post we will comment on a few of these methods.

1. Lemon juice: Lemon juice, fresh or not, will not whiten teeth. Lemon juice is actually citric acid and has a very low pH of 2.3 (which is very acidic). It will erode the outer enamel covering of a tooth. This can cause sensitivity and rapid tooth decay.

2. Baking Soda:  The abrasive properties of baking soda can cause excessive wear and damage to the enamel of your teeth. This results in sensitivity and increased risk for developing cavities.

3. Brushing with Strawberries:  This is another “home remedy” purported to help whiten teeth, but can be dangerous. Strawberries get their power to brighten teeth from ascorbic acid — and acids are harmful to teeth.  It doesn’t take long for acids to erode dental enamel and cause sensitivity and decay.

4. Oil Pulling : The Ayurvedic practice of swishing oil in your mouth—may not be bad for you, but there’s little evidence that it cleans teeth and none that it can cure anything else. The practice itself is pretty safe and not likely to cause                                                          harm, but hard evidence of the benefits and risks is hard to come by.

5. Brushing teeth with salt:  Brushing with salt will not whiten teeth. It will cut the gums and rub away the outer layer of the tooth because it is so abrasive. Your teeth may look whiter, but they will be damaged and are likely to need repair
 

6. Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide:  You should never rinse with hydrogen peroxide to whiten your teeth! This will not only not whiten your teeth, but you can do significant damage to your gums and lining of your mouth. You can also disrupt the normal flora of bacteria in your mouth. The effectiveness of using over the counter hydrogen peroxide as a mouth rinse to bleach your teeth is very ineffective.

CONCULSION:  There are many other home remedies out there and while some home remedies MAY appear to whiten your teeth, there’s a real risk of severe and permanent tooth or gum damage when using any of them.   If you erode the enamel on your teeth, you are not only at risk for increased sensitivity and decay, but the underlying dentin (which is a darker colour) can show through and actually make the tooth look darker, not whiter! The safest option and most effective option is to choose a teeth whitening method that requires dental supervision so the dentist can  evaluate your dental health before proceeding, adding a second level of care and caution to prevent damage or discomfort.


If you’re thinking about getting an oral piercing — or if you already have one — there are some health risks you should know about.  A mouth piercing can interfere with speech, chewing, or swallowing, however of more concern are the following:

◦ Infection:  Over 700 different strains of bacteria have been detected in the human mouth.  The site of piercing carries the potential for infection. Food particles can also accumulate around piercings and become a breeding ground for bacteria.

◦ Nerve damage:  Numbness or loss of sensation at the site of the piercing can occur if nerves are damaged when the tongue is pierced. This numbness can be temporary or permanent. Nerve damage can also possibly change your sense of taste or how you move your mouth.

◦ Prolonged bleeding.  The tongue is quite vascular, and if blood vessels are punctured during piercing, prolonged bleeding can occur and can cause serious blood loss.

◦ Swelling.  Swelling commonly occurs after oral piercing. Following piercing, it can be severe enough to block the airway and make breathing difficult.

◦ Excessive drooling and difficulty speaking and eating: Oral jewelry can cause excessive saliva production and can affect your ability to pronounce words clearly.

◦ Damage to teeth:  Teeth that come into contact with mouth jewelry can chip or crack. One study in a dental journal reported that 47% of people wearing barbell tongue jewelry for 4 or more years had at least one chipped tooth

   
 ◦
 Gum disease: People with oral piercings have a greater risk of gum 
 disease than those without oral piercings. The jewelry can come into contact
 with gum tissue causing injury as well as a recession of the gum tissue, which
 can lead to loose teeth and tooth loss.


◦ Allergic reaction to metal. An allergic reaction to the metal in the jewelry can occur in susceptible people.

 Jewelry aspiration. Jewelry that becomes loose in the mouth can become a choking hazard and, if swallowed, can result in injury to the lungs or digestive track.

◦ X-rays: Mouth jewelry can interfere with dental radiographs (x-rays).

◦ Bloodborne disease transmission: Oral piercing is a potential risk factor for the transmission of herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B and C.

◦ Heart Problems: Oral piercings carry a potential risk of endocarditis, an inflammation of the heart valves or tissues. Bacteria can enter the bloodstream through the piercing site in the mouth and travel to the heart, where they can cause serious problems.

Sunningdale Dental is excited to introduce our new team members.  Dr. Mike joined our team in July and Dr. Lindsay joined us in September. 


Dr. Michael Carson  

Dr. Michael Carson (Dr. Mike) was born and raised in London, Ontario. He began his undergrad at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. While working towards his Bachelor of Science he was accepted into the dental program at Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary. In 2016 he received his Doctor of Medical Dentistry (D.M.D.). Upon returning to Canada he began the National Dental Examining Board equivalency process, which he completed in June of 2018.


Mike loves to play hockey and golf. He enjoys travelling and spending time up at his family cottage

Dr. Lindsay Aiello

Dr. Lindsay Aiello was born in Montreal, Quebec, and raised in London, Ontario. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph, receiving a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in 2013. Dr. Aiello then continued her studies in Dublin, Ireland, where she received a Bachelor of Arts (B.A) and Honours Bachelor of Dental Science (H.B.D.S) in 2018. 

Lindsay enjoys spending time with her family and friends, horseback riding and all forms of water sports at the cottage.
 
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Creative Tooth Fairy Ideas

Losing one’s baby teeth is a big deal. Use this opportunity to celebrate growing up by making the first tooth a special event. Here are some ways (simple and inexpensive) that you can add a little magic to the experience.
 


1. Use a special coin.
Quarters and dollars may be a lot of money to your child, but they’re pretty mundane. Everyone has them. Spruce up the event by giving out a denomination that isn’t quite as common, like a half dollar or silver dollar coin.  You can also use clear glitter nail polish and paint the coin you use – to make extra special tooth fairy money.
 


2. Catch the tooth fairy in the act.
Create a photo of the tooth fairy visiting your child by taking a picture of them sleeping the night the fairy visits. Upload it to iCaughtTheToothFairy.com and receive a digital image that shows the tooth fairy herself in the middle of her transaction. ($10 charge).




For free you can upload the photo to a site like PicMonkey and add some star bursts. Download an image of the tooth fairy and insert it into your picture. (Once you have uploaded your picture – go to the “butterfly icon” on the left – and it will open up “overlays” – go to “elements” and then “sparkle stars”


 

3. Sprinkle some “fairy dust.”
Pick up some glitter at the dollar store and spread it on the child’s window sill, floor, or pillow. You can also have the child leave his or her tooth in a glass of water. At night remove the tooth – put some colour and glitter in the glass.




4. Write a letter from the tooth fairy.
Instead of just leaving money, write a letter to your child from the tooth fairy that praises him/her for good behavior and encourages more. You can do something as simple as writing a note with a pencil and piece of paper, or you can be as creative as you like with stickers or drawings. Make sure to sign the tooth fairy’s name. There are also several places on the web that will help you customize notes or letters. Use these adorable free printable tooth fairy notes from Handmade Charlotte.    They include a small envelope to place the tooth in and a notecard from the tooth fairy
http://www.handmadecharlotte.com/free-printable-tooth-fairy-notes/

 


5.  Keepsakes   Buy or make a special Tooth Fairy pillow or box. Etsy.com has cute pillows, or bowls etc., if you are not the creative type.  Or you can go to the craft store or dollar store, buy some paints and create a container. 






6.  A Tooth Fairy Door Set up a miniature door for the Tooth Fairy to come through.  You can buy one on a site like Etsy.com, or decorate a dollhouse door yourself, and hang it on the wall so that the Tooth Fairy can get into the kids’ rooms.


 


Your Child’s First Visit — Make it Fun!

Visiting the dentist for the first time should be a positive, fun experience for your child.  There are some things you can do to help prepare your child for their first visit.

      

Get some books about visiting the dentist and use story time to discuss visiting the dentist. Some children’s books that talk about going to the dentist are:  “Just Going to the Dentist” by Mercer Mayer,  “What to Expect When You Go to the Dentist” By Heidi Murkoff, and “Going to the Dentist” (Usborne First Experiences Book), and “The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist” by Stan & Jan Berenstain.
 

Practice having your child open wide (like a lion), and count their teeth.  Use a little mirror if you have one.  Let them look at and count your teeth.
 

Play “Dentist” using props like a toothbrush, a flashlight, and cups for rinsing.  Have your child lie down and open their mouth like they would in a dental chair.  Shine the light in their mouth, count their teeth again.  Even use a toothbrush to “polish” their teeth.  Once you have played dentist with them, and they have practiced on you, have them pretend to take their favourite stuffed animal to the dentist for a check up!  Do this several times over the course of a few weeks prior to their first appointment.
 

Explain what other things the dentist may do during the appointment.  Use simple, non-technical language. Don’t try to explain X-rays, instead simply say, “The dentist might take some pictures of your teeth with a special camera”.
 

Prior to booking their first appointment, have them accompany you or an older sibling to a routine dental “check up” appointment.  Let them watch how you do it, and then let them have a ride in the chair, and a treat from the treasure box.  We are happy to accommodate children in this way, as are most offices.  This is a great way to get them familiar with the dental office and the staff.


Let your child bring his or her favourite stuffed toy along to their visit.


What should I NOT do when preparing my child for their first dental visit?

  • Do not wait for an emergency to take your child to the dentist for the first visit.
  • If you are nervous about going to the dentist, do not express any of your own fears or anxieties.
  • Do not use phrases like “It won’t hurt” or “Don’t be scared”. Comments like these are not soothing and usually only create anxiety.   


You should take your child to the dentist when they begin to get their teeth – usually around their first birthday.  Until they are approximately 3 – 4 years old, the visits will be short and are done to ensure that there is no decay or other problems present.  Around the age of 3 – 4, children are usually old enough to sit and have their teeth cleaned, along with a “check-up”.
We love seeing children at Sunningdale Dental, and they love coming to see us.  Give us a call today to book your child’s first dental visit.